Maceira-Liz plant Cement Museum

The museum is free

Plan a Visit
Visits do not need an appointment on the open days and individuals are welcome
Visit mode – On foot
Difficulty level - Medium
Group Tours - Yes
Minimum group size – 10 people
Maximum group size – 25 people
Guided Tours - Yes
Additional facilities – Reception, shop, bar and meeting room.

Operation:
Tuesday from 10h00 to 17h00
Weekends from 14h00 to 18h00

There is also the possibility of punctual opening on other days with prior appointment

The Cement Museum, which celebrated its 25th anniversary in 2016, is a non-profit facility whose main role is to collect, preserve and disseminate the history, culture and heritage of the Maceira-Liz plant.

Programme of Activities
The regular activities offered by the museum include the Educational Service, essentially for schools, which offers a guided tour by former workers and technical staff.

Study and Research Resource Service
This space targets research into history, industrial archaeology, geology, paleontology, sociology, anthropology, technology and the environment.

Audiovisual and Multimedia Resources
Visitors to the museum can watch two films - "O Fabrico de Barricas de Cimento" (Manufacturing Cement Barrels) and "Pedras de Portugal" (Stones of Portugal), both produced in the mid-1930s at the Leiria Cement Company (E.C.L.)

Central Unit

The Central Unit of the Maceira-Liz plant Cement Museum was inaugurated on 22 April, 1991 and was re-structured between 2003 and 2006 and refurbished in 2011. It includes a permanent exhibition of the history of the Leiria Cement Company (E.C.L.), offering the visitor a chronological account from its foundation in 1923 to the present day.

In two permanent exhibition spaces it is proposed a journey through history, technological evolution and the development of the social work of the Cement Company of Leiria in Maceira-Liz. The cement manufacturing process, the geological and paleontological characteristics of the area and the connection with the surrounding community of Maceira are described through numerous original documents and photographs of the time. Visitors can also watch a film from the mid-1930s on the manufacturing process and the packaging and shipping of cement.

The exhibition also dedicates an area to E.C.L.'s expansion into Africa (1944-1963), in Mozambique and Angola, where the Company built three factories. Finally, there is a space dedicated to the latest technological innovations.

Turbo-Generator Plant

With the start of the second kiln in 1928, the Turbo-Generator Plant was installed, supplied by a boiler and hot gases from the kilns, thus promoting co-generation of electricity.

To this AEG turbo-alternator group, with capacity of 1550 KW, a second Brown Boveri turbo-alternator, with capacity of 1250KW and three steam-fed boilers were added in 1948.

The Turbo-Generator Plant was decommissioned in 1972. The building and its original equipment are currently preserved and have been converted into a museum, with the industrial architectural features of the time maintained.

Locomotive No. 1

Locomotive No. 1 was manufactured in Germany by A. Borsig and was purchased in 1926. It made its first trip to Martingança station in July of the same year along the rail link connecting E.C.L. to the Western Line at the station.

Initially, the movement of the trainsets was managed by the national rail service (CP), which assisted with the manoeuvres of the wagons inside the plant and between the plant and Martingança. This was justified by the enormous number of trains travelling from the plant.

Locomotive No. 1 is one of the rarest surviving examples in Europe and was in operation until 1987. It was steam powered and had a top speed of 30 km / h.

Line III Museological Circuit

In the 1930s, the Maceira-Liz plant started a new phase of development and technological innovation with the installation of a third production line. The new line, which was commissioned in 1938, was designed to function independently of the two other lines (I and II) and is therefore called the "new plant".

During their route through the museum, visitors can observe and follow the cement manufacturing stages through the Circuit of Stone, designed to convey the main transformation stages.

One of the key innovations of this production line was the introduction of compressed air into the manufacturing process. It was in this context that the Compressor Unit appeared.

Documentation and Interpretation Centre (DIC)

The Documentation and Interpretation Centre was created in 2006 to assist the Maceira-Liz Museum by providing a space dedicated to research and the study of collections and to welcome visitors.

This infrastructure, installed in what was for decades used as the E.C.L. Drawing Room, offers a space for visitors (reception, shop, cafeteria / restaurant); an auditorium / temporary exhibition room / multi-purpose room; and an area for receiving and processing documentation.

Limestone Quarry Observatory

The Limestone Quarry Observatory is a special area for understanding the local geological and palaeontological environment and quarrying activity, which is the first stage of the cement manufacturing process.

This is also an observation area for several bird species, especially birds of prey and waterfowl. An panel provides visitors with information on some bird species that come to the quarry for food and shelter or to nest.

Jurassic Garden

The marl and limestone from the Maceira-Liz plant's quarries date back to the Jurassic Period. The palaeontological heritage, largely consisting of marine cephalopod fossils, suggests that the area of the quarries at that time was underwater.

The Jurassic Garden offers visitors a small educational circuit offering knowledge about the local geology and palaeontology.

This feature aims to recreate a past going back more than 150 million years, with a small collection of fossils of ammonites and trace fossils of the marine environment and some flora from the Jurassic period.

The flora of this era essentially consists of Gymnosperms (flowerless plants) that gradually ceded ground in the Cretaceous period to Angiosperms (flowering plants), which remains the situation today. Plant species such as cycas, araucarias, ginkgos, junipers, yews and puzzlegrasses can all be found here.

Water Park

Given the environmental problems facing humanity, increasing pollution and global warming, water is an increasingly scarce and important resource, which requires more and more conscious measures.

The Water Park was created to alert people to the importance of water resources and inform visitors about the water treatment process at the Maceira-Liz plant, from its capture to the final supply of drinking water for social and industrial uses.

Maceira-Liz plant Cement Museum

The museum is free

Plan a Visit
Visits do not need an appointment and individuals are welcome
Visit mode – On foot
Difficulty level - Medium
Group Tours - Yes
Minimum group size – 10 people
Maximum group size – 25 people
Observations - Thursdays by appointment.
Guided Tours - Yes
Additional facilities – Reception, shop, bar and meeting room.

Operation Central Core:
Wednesday from 10h00 to 17h00
Weekends from 14h00 to 18h00

Operation All Others:
Thursday from 14h00 to 18h00
Weekends from 14h00 to 18h00

There is also the possibility of punctual opening on other days with prior appointment

The Cement Museum, which this year is celebrating its 25th anniversary, is a non-profit facility whose main role is to collect, preserve and disseminate the history, culture and heritage of the Maceira-Liz plant. Secil also offers a museum circuit, open to the general public, for visits to other points of interest.

Programme of Activities
The regular activities offered by the museum include the Educational Service, essentially for schools, which offers a guided tour by former workers and technical staff.

Study and Research Resource Service
The museum's resource services focus on the social and natural sciences to provide education and awareness-raising in Heritage and Environment. This space targets research into history, industrial archaeology, sociology, anthropology, technology and the environment.

Audiovisual and Multimedia Resources
Visitors to the museum can watch two films - "O Fabrico de Barricas de Cimento" (Manufacturing Cement Barrels) and "Pedras de Portugal" (Stones of Portugal), both produced in the mid-1930s at the Leiria Cement Company (E.C.L.)

Central Unit

The Central Unit of the Maceira-Liz plant Cement Museum was inaugurated on 22 April, 1991 and was re-structured between 2003 and 2006 and refurbished in 2011. It includes a permanent exhibition of the history of the Leiria Cement Company (E.C.L.), offering the visitor a chronological account from its foundation in 1923 to the present day.

It has two exhibition spaces, one on the cement manufacturing process and another on quarry geology and palaeontology. This journey through the history and the technological and social change of the factory is provided through numerous photographic documents of the time and original objects and technical documentation. Visitors can also watch a film from the mid-1930s on the process of manufacturing, packaging and shipping cement.

The exhibition also dedicates an area to E.C.L.'s expansion into Africa (1944-1963), in Mozambique and Angola, where the Company built three factories. Finally, there is a space dedicated to the latest technological innovations.

Turbo-Generator Plant

The power to start the construction of E.C.L. was provided by a group of three generators powered by diesel engines - only the building (Diesel Unit) remains today. Following the commissioning of the first 2 kilns, the Turbo-Generator Plant was set up and supplied by hot gases from the kilns, thus promoting co-generation of electricity.

Later, in 1928, an AEG turbo-alternator group, with capacity of 1550 KW, was installed in the Turbo-Generator Plant, with the later addition of a second BBC turbo-alternator, with capacity of 1250KW and three steam-fed boilers.

The Turbo-Generator Plant was decommissioned in 1972. The building and its original equipment are currently preserved and have been converted into a museum, with the industrial architectural features of the time maintained.

Locomotive No. 1

Locomotive No. 1 was manufactured in Germany and was purchased in 1926. It made its first trip to Martingança station in July of the same year along the rail link connecting E.C.L. to the Western Line at the station.

Initially, the movement of the trainsets was managed by the national rail service (CP), which assisted with the manoeuvres of the wagons inside the plant and between the plant and Martingança. This was justified by the enormous number of trains travelling from the plant.

Locomotive No. 1 is one of the rarest surviving examples in Europe and was in operation until 1987. It was steam powered and had a top speed of 30 km / h.

Line III Museological Circuit

In the 1930s, the Maceira-Liz plant started a new phase of development and technological innovation with the installation of a third production line. The new line, which was commissioned in 1938, was designed to function independently of the two other lines (I and II) and is therefore called the "new plant".

During their route through the museum, visitors can observe and follow the cement manufacturing stages through the Circuit of Stone, designed to convey the main transformation stages.

One of the key innovations of this production line was the introduction of compressed air into the manufacturing process. It was in this context that the Compressor Unit appeared.

Documentation and Interpretation Centre (DIC)

The Documentation and Interpretation Centre was created in 2006 to assist the Maceira-Liz Museum by providing a space dedicated to research and the study of collections and to welcome visitors.

This infrastructure, installed in what was for decades used as the E.C.L. Drawing Room, offers a space for visitors (reception, shop, cafeteria / restaurant); an auditorium / temporary exhibition room / multi-purpose room; and an area for receiving and processing documentation.

For the visitor, the DIC also offers the opportunity to view a film from the 1930s, an important document about the plant, showing all the stages of cement manufacturing.

Limestone Quarry Observatory

The Limestone Quarry Observatory is a special area for understanding the local geological and palaeontological environment and quarrying activity, which is the first stage of the cement manufacturing process.

This is also an observation area for several bird species, especially birds of prey and waterfowl. An panel provides visitors with information on some bird species that come to the quarry for food and shelter or to nest.

Jurassic Garden

The marl and limestone from the Maceira-Liz plant's quarries date back to the Jurassic Period. The palaeontological heritage, largely consisting of marine cephalopod fossils, suggests that the area of the quarries at that time was underwater.

The Jurassic Garden offers visitors a small educational circuit with information panels offering knowledge about the local geology and palaeontology.

This feature aims to recreate a past going back more than 150 million years, with a small collection of fossils of ammonites and trace fossils of the marine environment and some flora from the Jurassic period.

The flora of this era essentially consists of Gymnosperms (flowerless plants) that gradually ceded ground in the Cretaceous period to Angiosperms (flowering plants), which remains the situation today. Plant species such as cycas, araucarias, ginkgos, junipers, yews and puzzlegrasses can all be found here.

Water Park

Given the environmental problems facing humanity, increasing pollution and global warming, water is an increasingly scarce and important resource, which requires more and more conscious measures.

The Water Park was created to alert people to the importance of water resources and inform visitors about the water treatment process at the Maceira-Liz plant, from its capture to the final supply of drinking water for social and industrial uses.